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Full text of "Announcement of Pickering College for the year 1884-1885"


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4 ANNOUNCEMENT* 



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Pickering College 



FOR THE YEAR 



1884-5 



" ZJe/je proviso principle/, ponantur." 





TORONTO : 
C. BLACKETT ROBINSON, PRINTER, 5 JORDAN STREET. 

1884. 



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Digitized by the Internet Archive 
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http://archive.org/details/announcementofpi8485pick 



ANNOUNCEMENT 



PICKERING COLLEGE, 



FOR THE YEAR 



1884-85. 



"Bene proviso, principia ponantur. 



%otaxtta\ 

C. BLACKETT ROBINSON, PRINTER, 5 JORDAN STREET. 



CONTENTS. 



PAGE. 

Committee of Management 5 

Officers and Teaching Staff 6 

The College 7 

Design of the School 8 

The Lower School 8 

The Upper School 9 

Professional Examinations 10 

Examinations held in the College 10 

Commercial Form 11 

Pickering College Commercial Certificates 11 

Phonography 13 

Painting and Drawing 13 

Music 13 

Discipline and Conduct 14 

Recreation ' 16 

Literary Society and Reading-room 16 

School Library 17 

Museum 17 

Religious and Moral Instruction and Sabbath Observance 18 

Terms and Fees 19 

Extras 19 

Applications and Admissions 20 

Conclusion 20 

Appendix I, Catalogue of Students, 1883-84 22 

II. Conduct Rules and Hour Table . . 24-26 

III. Officers of Literary Society 27 

IV. The Reading-room — Newspapers and Periodicals 29 

V. Athletic Clubs 31 



PICKERING COLLEGE. 



COMMITTEE OF MANAGEMENT. 



Trustees : 

CYRUS R. SING Meaford. 

ELIAS ROGERS Toronto. 

ANTHONY T. HAIGHT Wellington. 



Representatives of Yearly Meeting : 

JOHN RICHARD HARRIS Rockwood. 

CHARLES WALKER. Norwich. 

STEPHEN W. WHITE Bloomfield. 

CHRISTOPHER DALE Pickering. 

W. V. WRIGHT Pickering. 

ANTHONY T. HAIGHT Wellington. 



Chairman : Secretary : 

JOHN RICHARD HARRIS. I ELIAS ROGERS. 



PICKERING COLLEGE. 



OFFICERS: 
The Principal W. H. HUSTON, M.A. 

The Superintendent A. S. ROGERS. 

The Matron , MARTHA ROGERS. 

The House-Master E. J. McINTYRE, B.A. 

The Governess , JENNIE B. SLATER. 



TEACHING STAFF: 

WILLIAM H. HUSTON, M.A First Class Honor Man of the University 

of Toronto; 

Classics and Phonography. 

E. J. McINTYRE, B.A First Class Honor Man of the University 

of Toronto ; 

Modern Languages and English. 

C. L. CRASSWELLER, B.A First Class Honor Man of the University 

of Toronto ; 

Mathematics and Natural Science. 

H. W. WESTLAKE, B.A Honor Man of the University of Queen's 

College, Kingston; 

Commercial Branches. 

AMELIA E. POLSON First Class Certificate; 

Junior Classes. 

ED. S. SHRAPNEL, A.R.C.A , Drawing and Painting. 

J. DAVENPORT KERRISON, Toronto Vocal and Instrumental Music. 

JENNIE B. SLATER Music. 



PHYSICIAN: 

BYRON FIELD, M.B Pickering. 



ANNOUNCEMENT. 



THE COLLEGE. 

Pickering College has been established by the Society of 
Friends for the purpose of educating young people of both 
sexes (irrespective of their religious denomination), and is con- 
ducted under the control of a committee of the Canada Yearly 
Meeting. 

The College is located in the Village of Pickering, quite near 
the Pickering Station of the Grand Trunk Railway (twenty-four 
miles east of Toronto), and only five miles west of the Town of 
Whitby, and thus is easy of access from all points — east, west, 
and north. 

The College buildings are beautifully situated in a healthy 
locality upon the summit of a gently-rising slope, and command 
an extensive view of the surrounding country and of Lake 
Ontario. 

They are handsomely built of red brick and cut-stone facings, 
four stories in height. The main building has 106 feet frontage, 
and in it are the dining-room, school, class and lecture rooms, 
Principal's room, Superintendent's and Matron's rooms, and 
Teachers' parlors. The two wings extend over eighty feet back, 
and contain the Laboratory and the students' parlors and sleep- 
ing apartments. All the rooms are lofty and spacious, and will 
be heated this year by means of steam, which will render the 
College still more agreeable and healthy. 

The beauty of the surrounding landscapes and the quiet of the 
village and country invite to studiousness, while the absence of 
many temptations peculiar to large towns and cities renders the 
place eminently safe for the residence of students removed from 
the watchful guardianship of home. 



8 

DESIGN OF THE SCHOOL. 

The object of Pickering College is to secure to its students as 
thorough an education as can be obtained outside of a university 
or of a professional school, and at the same time to surround 
them with all the moral influences and guarded care of a well- 
conducted home. 

The qualification for entrance into the College is the same as 
that required for High Schools and Collegiate Institutes, but 
there are two preparatory classes for those not having passed the 
Entrance Examination. 

The programme of studies for entered students is arranged 
with four main objects in view: First, to prepare students for 
passing the examinations annually held by the Department of 
Education, called the Intermediate Examination, or Examina- 
tion for Third and Second Class Certificates ; secondly, to 
prepare students for passing the Examination for First Class 
Certificates, and also University Examinations of Junior Ma- 
triculation, Senior Matriculation, and the Examination of the 
First Year ; thirdly, to give a sound business education ; and 
lastly, to afford thorough instruction in the fine arts — Music, 
Drawing and Painting. 

THE LOWER SCHOOL. 

The Intermediate Examination, held annually in the month 
of July, has been instituted by the Department of Education, to 
facilitate the classification of students in the High Schools and 
Collegiate Institutes. As far as it goes it is the same as the 
Examinations for Non-professional Third Class and Second 
Class Teachers' Certificates, these examinations including more 
subjects and requiring higher percentages. A student may try 
the Intermediate alone, or, if he desire, be a candidate at the 
same time for a Non-professional Third Class Certificate. 

A student intending to pass the Intermediate Examination, 
if qualified to enter the Second Form, may hope to do so at 
the end of one school year, though clever pupils often succeed 
in passing in a school half-year. But the better way is for every 
student to take at least one year after he is qualified to enter the 
Second Form. 



9 

Those not prepared to enter the Second Form may enter the 
First Form, in which are read portions of the usual subjects 
of the Intermediate Examination. A student who has an 
entrance certificate, or an equivalent qualification, should 
remain in this form at least one school year. 

These two forms constitute the Lower School ; and while no 
student in the Lower School will be compelled to attempt to 
pass the examination specified above, yet every student is recom- 
mended to do so ; for apart from the stimulus and direction which 
the hope of passing such an examination naturally gives, there 
is the direct material advantage to the successful candidate, of a 
Government certificate of qualification, which is acknowledged 
by everybody. All students, therefore, whether intending to 
teach or not, are recommended to attempt this examination. 

In the Lower School, in addition to the studies included in 
the above examination, Latin, Greek, French and German may 
be taken up by any student who desires to do so, either for pass- 
ing a University Examination, or for any other purpose. 

THE UPPER SCHOOL. 

The Upper School comprises those students who, having an 
Intermediate Certificate, or an equivalent qualification, wish to 
read for some university or professional examination, or simply 
to continue usefully their school career. 

It is earnestly recommended, however, that every student in 
the Upper School, not having a professional examination in 
view, will read for one of the University Examinations, or, if a 
lady, at least for the " Special Examinations for Women," which 
have been established by the University of Toronto. And this 
is recommended for a similar reason to the one assigned above 
in regard to students in the Lower School : that in addition to 
the incitement and direction to study which the pupose of pass- 
ing such an examination gives, there is to the successful candi- 
date the direct material advantage of a certificate of qualification 
recognized by everybody and valid for all time. Special atten- 
tion is paid to candidates for the various Teachers' Certificates. 



10 
PROFESSIONAL EXAMINATIONS. 

Canada is a young country, and its people are essentially prac- 
tical, and very many in wishing for an education have a direct 
aim in view, viz., that of entering one of the professions. Nearly 
all our professions require entrance examinations. It is an aim 
of Pickering College to prepare students for the examinations 
required for entrance into the professions, and to this end special 
classes are established for such examinations, and no student is 
required to attend any classes, or prepare any work not bearing 
directly on the proposed examination, so that the examination may 
be passed in the shortest possible time. 

Among such professional examinations may be ennumerated 
that required for entrance into the Law Society, into the College 
of Physicians and Surgeons, those required for entrance into 
Knox College and similar institutions, into the School of Prac- 
tical Science, the Royal College of Dental Surgeons, the Ontario 
School of Agriculture, that required by the Board of Examiners 
of Land Surveyors, etc., etc. 

EXAMINATIONS HELD IN THE COLLEGE. 

(a) The Entrance Examination to High Schools, the Intermediate 
Examination, and the Examinations for Third and Second Class 
Teachers Certificates. 

{b) University Examinations for Women. — These examinations 
are held in the College by the University of Toronto, and the 
honour of passing them is much prized by lady students. 

(c) Examinations for Commercial Certificates. (See pp. 11-13.) 

({d) "Written Examinations" are held at intervals of three 
weeks, for the purpose of preparing students for writing at public 
examinations, and also in order to test the character of the work 
done by them in their studies. These examinations are held on 
Friday afternoons, commencing at half-past one o'clock, and 
last, as a rule, two hours. They are conducted, as far as pos- 
sible, with all the carefulness and exactness of the public exam- 
inations held by the Education Department and the University. 
The papers are first read by the examiners ; then the results and 
papers are overlooked by the Principal, who subsequently, before 



II 

the entire school, makes such remarks upon them as he may think 
proper. The results, arranged in alphabetical order, are then 
placed upon the bulletin-boards for reference. 

COMMERCIAL FORM. 

Many boys and young men are anxious to obtain a thorough 
business education without being forced to study those subjects 
required only for entrance into the learned professions. To meet 
this want, there has been established in Pickering College a 
Commercial Form, in which no student is required to take other 
subjects than Commercial Arithmetic, Book-keeping, Penman- 
ship, Business Composition, and Commercial Geography. These 
subjects are taught so thoroughly that an industrious and atten- 
tive pupil, who has passed through the form, will be as competent 
to work in a counting-house or take charge of a set of books as 
it is possible to be without actual business experience. 

In the past the Commercial Form has been one of the most 
satisfactory departments of the College. Students in it have 
made very creditable progress, and have attained results which 
quite justify the above statement. 

Any student of the Commercial Form, who wishes to do so, 
may take up any other subject taught in the College. 

PICKERING COLLEGE COMMERCIAL CERTIFICATES. 

In order to test the character of the work done in the Com- 
mercial Form, and to give to meritorious students an opportunity 
of securing a fitting testimonial of their attainments in the studies 
pursued by them in the College, examinations are held in June and 
December, at which papers are set in the following subjects : — 

I. Business Forms and Business Correspondence. 
II. Theoretical Book-keeping. 

III. Practical Book-keeping. 

IV. Commercial Arithmetic. 
V. Mental Arithmetic. 

VI. Commercial Geography. 
VII. Dictation. 
VIII. English Grammar (practical). 



12 

IX. Penmanship. (Special importance will be attached to 
this subject.) 
X. Phonography (optional). 

In Commercial Arithmetic the limits will be: — Fractions, Com- 
mon and Decimal ; Percentage, Proportion, Currencies, Profit 
and Loss, Commission, Insurance, Duties and Customs, Average, 
Bankruptcy; Interest, with shortened methods of computing it ; 
Partial Payments, Exchange, Stocks, Banking, Equation of Pay- 
ments and Accounts, Account Sales, and Partnership. 

Mental Arithmetic. — The simple rules, and ordinary business 
calculations. 

Commercial Geography. — Dominion of Canada in detail. A 
general knowledge of the geography of Great Britain, its depen- 
dencies, and of the United States. The capitals, religions, forms 
of government, and exports of other countries. A detailed 
knowledge of Canadian railroads and waterways. The leading 
railroads and canals of the United States. 

The following gentlemen have consented to act as Examiners 
for the examinations to be held in 1884-85 : — 

Seymour R. Eaton, Esq., Author of " Eaton's Practical 
Grammar," Toronto, 

English Grammar. 

A. Stevenson, Esq., B.A., Upper Canada College, Toronto, 

Book-keeping. 

Jas. Davison, Esq., Mathematical Master, Guelph High School, 
Commercial Arithmetic. 

C. F. McGillivray, Esq., B.A., Head Master Fergus High 

School, 

Commercial Geography. 

Thomas Bengough, Esq., Official Reporter for York County 

Courts, 

Phonography. 



13 

To receive a Certificate of the Second Class, 40 per cent, in 
each subject and 60 per cent, of the total must be obtained. 

To receive a Certificate of the First Class, 60 per cent, in each 
subject and 75 per cent, of the total must be obtained. 

Fees — Candidates for this Examination must pay, before writ- 
ing, $2 to the Principal, one-half of which will be returned to 
any who may fail to pass. This fee is to meet in part the 
expenses of the Examination. 

Previous students may write for a Certificate by sending notice 
in writing to the Principal before the 1st of December or June. 
The fee must accompany the notice. 

PHONOGRAPHY. 

In the various avenues of business and professional life, perhaps 
no other knowledge is more advantageous to its possessor than 
that of being able to discard the tedious "long hand" method of 
writing for the far speedier system of " short hand." This is 
apart from the consideration that with many it is the means of 
earning a respectable livelihood. 

Classes are under the charge of a competent and enthusiastic 
teacher. Tuition Free. Three classes were maintained up to the 
end of the school year. 

PAINTING AND DRAWING. 

In this department students receive instruction from the dis- 
tinguished Canadian artist, Mr. Ed. S. Shrapnel, member of the 
Ontario Society of Artists, and Associate of the Royal Academy, 
Canada. 

Classes are formed in pencil and crayon drawing, and in oil 
and water-color painting. During the past year excellent 
work was done by the art pupils, whose numbers and en- 
thusiasm kept constantly increasing under the direction of the 
talented teacher. 

MUSIC 

Pickering College affords facilities second to none for obtaining 
an* advanced and thorough musical education. The department 
continues under the control of Mr. J. Davenport Kerrison, of 



Toronto, an able and distinguished master, who is well known 
in his profession. The lady assistant is a competent teacher. 
The system of instruction is uniform, so that the progress of 
students is not retarded when advancement takes place. 

A Choral Class, under the direction of Mr. Kerrison, is formed 
in connection with the College, and meets once a week. An 
opportunity is thus given of becoming acquainted with the theory 
of music, and good practice is obtained in sight reading and part 
singing, while special attention is given to voice culture. Private 
pupils receive careful training in vocal music. In order to cul- 
tivate purity and refinement of taste, the music studied is selected 
by the teachers. 

Music pupils take their places in order every week upon the 
programme of the Literary Society, and by playing before their 
teachers and classmates, overcome nervousness, acquire confi- 
dence, and become habituated to performing before numbers. 

The pianos used are new instruments, direct from the estab- 
lishment of Nordheimer & Co. 

DISCIPLINE AND CONDUCT. 

The Superintendent and Matron, three Masters and two Gov- 
ernesses reside in the College. 

Under the general oversight of the Principal, lady students are 
under the charge of the Governess, and male students under the 
charge of the House-master. The discipline of the College is 
strict, but, it is hoped, not severe. In addition to the lessons, 
recitations and lectures during the day, there are regular hours 
for study, morning and evening, under the supervision of teachers. 
After the " evening study " is over, no more study as a rule is 
permitted, except in the case of students whose age and general 
conduct warrant it, and to them the permission is given as freely 
as need be. 

Severe, or even frequent, punishment of any sort will not be 
resorted to. Gross misconduct or violation of rules will be met 
by instant suspension, and, after investigation by the College 
Committee, by dismissal. Persistent misconduct, even of a 
trifling nature, will be similarly dealt with. 



J 5 

It is the hope of the Committee to fill the College with earnest 
students, who will do their work for its own sake. The idle and 
vicious, after a fair trial, will be got rid of. 

The system of co-education of the sexes, judiciously pursued, 
is not only practicable, it is eminently advantageous. The daily 
association of young people in the presence of careful teachers 
is found to elevate decidedly the standard of their deportment 
and scholarship. Students have separate walks, grounds en- 
trances and gymnasiums, and occupy separate tables in the 
dining-room. No communications are allowed, and the school- 
rooms, halls and apartments of the officers and teachers are so 
located as to separate completely the portion of the building 
occupied by the male students from that occupied by the lady 
students. Students meet socially only at the conversazione at 
the close of the weekly meeting of the Literary Society, when 
teachers are always present. 

On Friday afternoons Conversations on Deportment are con- 
ducted by the Principal, which are attended by all the students 
on alternate weeks. 

The experience of past years has shown that a fair standard of 
discipline can be obtained with but few arbitrary rules : that 
order being much superior which ensues from the observance of 
principles of conduct. It has been the aim of the officers of the 
school to implant and foster in students such principles of con- 
duct as shall give good results, not in school merely, but in 
after-life. But it has also been found that such rules as are 
established should be strictly enforced. 

In the Appendix will be found the more important rules and 
regulations relating to conduct and study, and it will be seen 
that these have been framed with the principal aim of obtaining 
from each student as faithful an employment of the time as is 
consistent with health and a fair amount of recreation. Parents 
can have every confidence that the most conscientious guardian- 
ship is exercised over students placed in the College. 



i6 

RECREATION. 

The grounds about the College afford sufficient means of re- 
creation. The main play-ground having become too confined for 
the increasing numbers who use it for the different games, a 
second play-ground has been secured from the field adjoining 
the first, and ample space is thus afforded for double sets of 
players at any game or games; close to the College are the 
croquet and archery grounds. The adjacent stream gives the 
boys excellent opportunities for bathing and swimming in the 
summer, and for skating in the winter. Students who wish may 
have flower-plots assigned to them for their own cultivation. 
The Committee are laying out the grounds (12 acres) in such a 
way as to make the naturally fine site of the College still more 
attractive, and give the students attending all the benefits and 
pleasures of free out-door life. It will be a chief aim of the 
officers and teachers to encourage in students a love of outside 
exercise, and no pains will be spared by the Committee to make 
this a prominent feature of the institution, so that the health of 
students may be secured in the best possible way, viz., by fresh 
air and out-door recreation. 

During inclement weather, and in the winter season, the Gym- 
nasiums may be advantageously used. 

Three Athletic Clubs have been established by the students — 
Archery, Foot-ball and Cricket, — and these, during the past year, 
have been very popular. The Cricket Club is capitally equipped. 
Archery is a favorite pastime with the young ladies, and their 
Club is well sustained. 

LITERARY SOCIETY AND READING-ROOM. 

A Literary Society is conducted by the students, and meets 
every Friday evening during College Terms. This Society has 
proved to be one of the most useful features of the College. Its 
" Laws and Rules of Order" have been framed with the greatest 
care, and with the intent that all belonging to the Society shall 
gain such experience in methods of transacting business in public 
meetings, as will be most useful to them in the actual affairs of 
life. On each evening, also, debates are held, or essays read, 



17 

and readings and recitations given, which tend to train the 
participants in these exercises in facility and exactness of 
expression in public assemblies, and at the same time members 
are led to acquire and develop a taste for useful and elevating 
literature, by the study and thoughtful preparation which they 
must necessarily devote to any exercise which is assigned to 
them in the programmes from week to week. 

The College Cabinet, the Society's manuscript paper, is read 
by the editors before the Society each Term. 

The College Reading-room is also managed by the Society, 
and affords to members the most ample facilities for becoming 
acquainted with not only the current news of the day, but also 
the choicest periodical literature of the time. In fact, as will 
be seen from the list of papers and magazines furnished to the 
Reading-room, given in the Appendix, there is a larger supply 
of reading matter than a student can possibly avail himself of. 

The affairs of the Literary Society are managed, conformable 
to the requirements of the Constitution, by a committee of mem- 
bers, called the General Committee, elected at the end of each 
Term. The names of the members of the General Committee 
are given in the Appendix. 

During the past year, a course of Lectures, by prominent 
educationists and others, was given to the students of the Col- 
lege. These lectures were very numerously attended by friends 
of the College residing in the vicinity, and it is the intention of 
the management to continue them during the coming year. 

SCHOOL LIBRARY. 

This is kept in the Main School-room, in open shelves, for 
ready access, and is supplied with an Encyclopaedia, Diction- 
aries, Atlases, full-bound sets of Entrance and Intermediate 
Examination Papers, University Examination Papers, and vari- 
ous other books of reference of great use to students in higher 
class work and side reading. 

MUSEUM. 

Steps are being taken to fit up a room suitable for a Museum. 
Through the kindness of Alfred R. C. Selwyn, LL.D., F.R.S., 



i8 

Director of the Geological Survey of Canada, a collection of 
Canadian Economic Minerals has been presented to the Col- 
lege. To increase the collection in the Museum, the Principal 
will gladly receive prepared birds and insects, fossils, antiquities, 
and rare or curious objects of any kind. The donor's name will 
be mentioned on the slips describing the specimens. 

RELIGIOUS AND MORAL INSTRUCTION AND SABBATH OBSERVANCE. 

The Superintendent is the representative in the College of the 
Society of Friends in all matters of a religious nature. All re- 
ligious meetings are under his supervision, and for them special 
times are set apart. 

Every day, morning and evening worship is conducted, either 
by the Superintendent or by some person appointed by him. 
School is opened and closed also by prayer and reading the 
Scriptures. 

On Sabbath-day those students who are not Friends, and 
whose parents desire it, are allowed to attend their own places 
of worship (if the services are held in the day-time) at such hours 
as shall not conflict with the College' Bible School ; all others 
are expected to attend the College Meeting. In Pickering there 
are, besides the Friends', the following places of worship : One 
Church of England, one Roman Catholic, one Presbyterian, one 
Methodist, one Bible Christian, one Disciples'. 

All students are accompanied to their respective places of 
worship by some teacher or proctor. 

On Sabbath afternoons Bible School is conducted by the 
Superintendent and assistant teachers. 

On Sabbath mornings and evenings, meetings for worship are 
conducted by the Superintendent. 

Note. — All students are expected to attend the Bible School 
and the Sabbath Evening Meetings, unless excused for good 
and sufficient reasons by the Superintendent. 

Prayer-meetings, attendance upon which is voluntary, are 
held once a week. The Management hope to make good influ- 
ences the brightest feature in the School. 



19 

TERMS AND FEES. 

The College year is practically contemporaneous with that of 
High Schools. Hence there are three Terms in the year. 

For the year 1884-85, the Autumn Term commences September 
1st, and ends December 22nd; 16 weeks. Fees — for Male 
Students, (a) $72, (b) $76; for Lady Students, (a) $68, (b) $72. 

The Winter Term commences January 5th, and ends March 
30th; 12 weeks. Fees — for Male Students, (a) $54, (b) $57; for 
Lady Students, (a) $51, (b) $54. 

The Spring Term commences April 6th, and ends June 29th ; 
12 weeks. Fees — for Male Students, (a) $54, (b) $57; for Lady 
Students, (a) $51, (b) $54. 

(a) Fees for Friends and children of ministers: (b) for all 
others. 

The above fees are payable in advance at the opening of the 
Term, either by cash or by approved note, and include board, 
washing, care of rooms, fuel, lights, tuition, and all necessary 
expenses except books and stationery. All fees are to be paid 
to the Superintendent, who will draw on parents and guardians 
not paying in the regular way. 

No allowances are made for short absences, or for absences 
during the first or last two weeks of a Term. Students are 
admitted at any time, and with these exceptions are charged 
pro rata from date of admission. 

The Fees for Day Students are $16 for the Autumn Term, $12 
for the Winter Term, and $12 for the Spring Term ; also payable 
in advance. 

In cases of protracted illness, students will be allowed to 
furnish satisfactory substitutes for the remainder of the Term, or 
to make up the time of their absence themselves, the next Term. 
If students should leave the College for any other cause, or be 
suspended, or expelled, they will forfeit their fees for that Term. 

EXTRAS. 

Per Term of Ten Weeks. 

Instrumental Music $8 00 

Vocal Lessons 8 00 



20 

Choral Class $i oo 

Use of instrument one hour daily 2 00 

(Additional time at a pro rata charge.) 

Drawing 4 00 

Painting in Oil or Water Colors 8 00 

As students are received only for the College Terms, Autumn, 
Winter and Spring, the fees for Extras are proportional to the 
above amounts. 

One lesson per week is given by Mr. Kerrison in music, or 
two lessons by Miss Slater. 

APPLICATIONS AND ADMISSIONS. 

Each application should state the age and standing of the ap- 
plicant; the examination, if any, which it is wished to prepare 
for ; whether a member of the Society of Friends or not ; and 
should be accompanied by satisfactory evidence of good moral 
character. No student will be received who has been dismissed 
from any school or college on account of bad conduct, or in 
regard to whom there is any such suspicion. 

Students coming from a distance are expected to reside in the 
College, and should, if possible, be present on the first day of 
each Term, on which day the allotment of rooms is made. In 
making the allotment reference will be had, as a general rule, 
first to seniority of residence, secondly to priority of application. 

Note. — All students on coming to the College are requested to 
have all their articles of linen and underclothing legibly marked 
with their names in ink. The rooms are furnished. Students 
are, however, expected to bring slippers to wear in the study 
rooms, also towels, lamp, and wash-bowl and pitcher, for their 
private use. The latter may be obtained in the Village. 

CONCLUSION. 

It is the purpose of the Society of Friends, and of the pro- 
moters of Pickering College, in endowing and maintaining it, to 
give to all students who attend it, as far as possible, a thoroughly 
useful and well-grounded liberal education, at the lowest possible 
cost. None but earnest students, those willing to work, are 



21 

invited to attend. There are no prizes or scholarships ; there is 
no marking system ; nor is any inducement held out to students 
to work and study, except the satisfying of their sense of duty, 
and the pleasure which comes to those who endeavour to acquire 
knowledge for its own sake. At the same time, such discipline 
is enforced that no student is allowed to idle. 

Any parent or guardian who may wish it may have from the 
Principal, as often as necessary, a written report of the conduct 
and progress of any student in whom he is interested. During 
the past year such reports have been sent fortnightly to the par- 
ents and guardians of all younger students. 

It may be added, that it is the hope of the Committee that 
many young men and young women who desire to prepare for 
some examination, or to pursue a course of study, but whose 
earlier education has been neglected, will find in Pickering 
College the kind of help and instruction they require, without 
the disagreeableness of being forced to submit to the grading 
and classification which are essential to large Government 
institutions. 

Applications for admission may be addressed to the Principal, 
who will be happy to furnish any further information in regard 
to the College, or any of the examinations for which it prepares 
candidates. 



22 



APPENDIX. 



I.— CATALOGUE OF STUDENTS, 1883-84. 



NAME. 



Post Office. 



Denomination. 



Form in School. 



Archer, Frank , 

Ashton, Joseph , 

Ashton, Walter 

Andrew, Thomas , 

Anderson, Christina , 

Andrew, Annie 

Brown, Ada 

Brown, Frederick 

Barker, Wm. E 

Briggs, Wm. Albert 

Bracken, Wm. J 

Barker, S. J 

Baldwin, David C 

Briant, Thomas 

Bunting, Minnie 

Boyes, Herbert.. 

Bowerman, David 

Brignall, Joseph J 

Botterell, Frederick 

Barker, Lewellys 

Cornwell, Albert 

Cronk, Seburn 

Cuthbert, William 

Crassweller, Frank 

Campbell, Robt 

Carlaw, Ella A 

Doyle, Etta 

Dollar, David 

Dale, Richard N 

Dale, Edith 

Enos, Mrs. G 

Freeman, Helen 

Fawcett, Adam 

Ferrier, David Wm 

Gillam, Charles Franklin. 

Garratt,Corinne 

Gibson, Alexander 

Gregory, Ronald 

Gormley, William 

Gormley, Thomas 

Gibson, Walter 

Huston, Carrie I 

Hilts, A 

Huber, Carlos 

Harris, William 

Houston, King 

Hoover, Frances 

Hilts, William 

Hunt, Melissa 

Hamilton, William 

Harold, William A 

Hoar, Thomas 

Kirkland, James 

Latchford, Richard 

Larkin, Thomas 

Larke, Aubrey 

Lloyd, George 

Leavens, Elizabeth 

Lawler, Arthur 

McConochie, Robert 

McMechan, Sidney 

Morrison, Donald 



Windsor 

Aurora 

Aurora 

Pickering 

Dunbarton 

Pickering 

Pickering 

Pickering 

Whitby 

Toronto 

Caledon East 

Whitby 

Toronto 

Toronto 

Pickering 

Toronto 

Bloomfield 

Brougham 

Ottawa 

Whitby 

Norwich 

Bloomfield 

Pickering 

Pickering 

Whitby 

Toronto 

Pickering 

Bracebridge 

Mariposa 

Pickering 

Cleveland, U.S.A.... 

Box Grove 

Uffington 

Claremont 

Norwich 

Wooler 

Berlin 

Hawtrey 

Pickering 

Pickering 

Whitby 

Pickering 

Pickering 

Bracebridge 

Rockwood 

Toronto 

Pickering 

Dunbarton 

Norwich 

Toronto 

Newmarket 

Bowmanville 

Pickering 

Pickering 

Pickering- 

Norwich 

Aurora 

Pickering 

Whitby 

Dunbarton 

Bloomfield 

Bracebridge 



Methodist 

Society of Friends... 
Society of Friends... 

Presbyterian 

Presbyterian 

Presbyterian 

Society of Friends... 
Society of Friends... 

Baptist 

Presbyterian 

Church of England.. 

Baptist 

Church of England.. 
Church of England.. 

Bible Christian 

Methodist 

Society of Friends... 

Bible Christian 

Church of England.. 

Baptist 

Society of Friends... 
Society of Friends... 
Church of England.. 

Presbyterian 

Presbyterian 

Presbyterian 

Society of Friends... 

Presbyterian 

Society of Friends... 
Society of Friends... 

Methodist 

Breth'n of One Faith 

Methodist 

Presbyterian 

Society of Friends... 
Society of Friends... 

Presbyterian 

Baptist 

Church of England. 
Church of England. 
Church of England. 
Church of England. 



Presbyterian 

Society of Friends. 

Presbyterian 

Methodist 



Methodist 

Presbyterian 

Society of Friends... 

Methodist 

Methodist 

Roman Catholic 

Roman Catholic 

Church of England 

Methodist 

Presbyterian 

Church of England 

Presbyterian 

Presbyterian 

Presbyterian 



Preparatory. 
Commercial. 
Pharmacy. 
Commercial. 
Third Class. 
Music. 
University. 
Intermediate. 
Preparatory. 
Second. 
Civil Service. 
Music. 
Second. 
Preparatory. 
Preparatory. 
Civil Engineering. 
Civil Engineering. 
Second. 
First. 

Second Class. 
Commercial. 
Commercial- 
Commercial. 
University. 
Preparatory. 
First. 

Third Class. 
Preparatory. 
Commercial. 
Music. 
Music. 
First. 

Civil Engineering. 
Junior Medical. 
Commercial. 
Intermediate. 
First. 
Second. 
Intermediate. 
Commercial. 
Commercial. 
Special. 
Special. 
Commercial. 
Second Class. 
First. 
Music. 
Fine Arts. 
Commercial. 
Preparatory. 
Commercial. 
Commercial. 
Commercial. 
Intermediate. 
Second Class. 
First. 
Pharmacy. 
Special. 
Commercial. 
Second Class. 
First. 
Preparatory. 



2 3 



CATALOGUE OF STUDENTS.— Continued. 



NAME. 



McLellan, James A 

Miller, William 

McGaw, James D 

Margach, Etta , 

McKnight, Lottie 

Mclntyre.E. J 

Martin, Stuart 

Milne, Charles 

McBrady, John 

Margach, James B 

Mitchell, George 

McDiarmid, Archibald..., 

Madill, Esther 

Oldright, Percy 

O'Leary, May , 

Putland, Katie , 

Peckham, Willard 

Peckham, Edward C... 

Proctor, James W 

Pitcher, Frank Arthur... 

Poldon.A.E 

Rogers, Harry Cortland 

Roach, W. Fletcher 

Rogers, Nettie 

Reed, William 

Russell, Frank H 

Reid, Norman 

Ross, — 

Reddin, Ella 

Rimer, George 

Roach, Mary F 

Stokes, George Edward 

Sampson, Arthur 

Sherin, Harry 

Slater, J. B 

Stanley, H. W 

Schooley, Augusta 

Tripp, John D. A 

Tupper, Arthur 

Trull, Edgar 

Trull, Herbert 

Trull, William 

Thorn, Walter 

Valentine, Jennie 

Walker, Edith 

Walker, Albert 

Wright, Geraldine 

Walker, Robert 

Webb, Frederick 

Walton, Jesse 

Wright, Charles 

Westney, Violet A 

Williams, Letitia A 



Post Office. 



Bowmanville 

Pickering 

Port Perry 

Pickering 

Manitoba 

Pickering 

Lindsay 

Bowmanville 

Pickering 

Pickering 

Greenwood 

Dornoch 

Greenwood 

Toronto 

Pickering 

Pickering 

Norwich 

Norwich 

Beaverton 

Norwich 

Norwich 

Hamilton , 

Pickering 

Oshawa 

Pickering , 

Toronto 

Portage du Fort, Q.. 

Uxbridge , 

Pickering , 

Bryson, Que 

Pickering , 

Toronto , 

Norwich 

Lakefield , 

Pickering 

Pickering 

Sparta , 

Dunbarton , 

Waterford 

Oshawa 

Oshawa 

Oshawa 

Dunbarton 

Pickering 

Beaconsheld 

Beaconsheld 

Pickering 

Toronto 

Newmarket 

Newmarket 

Pickering 

Pickering 

Chicago 



Denomination. 



Presbyterian 

Presbyterian 

Presbyterian 

Methodist 

Presbyterian 

Presbyterian 

Presbyterian 

Church of England, 

Roman Catholic 

Methodist 

Church of England 

Presbyterian 

Presbyterian 

Presbyterian 

Roman Catholic 

Roman Catholic , 

Society of Friends.., 
Society of Friends.., 

Presbyterian , 

Methodist 

Methodist , 

Presbyterian 

Bible Christian 

Christian 

Methodist 

Presbyterian 

Methodist 

Presbyterian 

Roman Catholic 

Church of England 

Bible Christian 

Baptist 

Church of England 

Methodist 

Methodist 

Bible Christian 

Society of Friends.. 

Methodist 

Methodist 

Methodist 

Methodist 

Methodist 

Presbyterian 

Methodist 

Society of Friends.. 
Society of Friends.. 
Society of Friends.. 

Methodist 

Society of Friends.. 
Society of Friends.. 

Presbyterian 

Church of England 
Presbyterian 



Form in School. 



Commercial. 
Commercial. 
First. 

Intermediate. 
First. 
Music. 
Preparatory. 
Preparatory. 
Intermediate. 
Intermediate. 
Commercial. 
First. 
Special. 
Preparatory. 
Special. 
Preparatory. 
Commercial. 
Commercial. 
Second. 
Commercial. 
Special. 
Commercial. 
Second Class. 
First. 
Second. 
Second. 
Commercial. 
University. 
First. 
Second. 
Special. 
Special. 
First. 
Second. 
Special. 
University. 
Preparatory. 
Intermediate. 
Commercial. 
Commercial. 
Commercial. 
Preparatory. 
'First Form. 
First Form. 
Intermediate. 
Preparatory. 
University. 
Preparatory. 
Intermediate. 
Commercial. 
Special. 
Preparatory. 
Preparatory. 



2 4 



II. CONDUCT RULES. 

[It is understood that all patrons and students of the College, by the fact of 
becoming such, assent to the Conduct Rules, as well as to the Regulations respect- 
ing all Fees and Dues.] 

EXTRACTS FROM GENERAL RULES OF CONDUCT FOR RESIDENT 
MALE STUDENTS. 

i. All Male Students of the College are under the charge of 
the House-master, whose duty it is, with the assistance of the 
other Resident Masters, to supervise their conduct and deport- 
ment, to correct for all ordinary delinquencies, and to report 
misconduct of a graver nature to the Principal. 

2. Male Students are requested to refer all ordinary permis- 
sions to the House-master, or in his absence to one of the As- 
sistant Masters, who will as a rule decide them, but may, if he 
prefers, refer them to the Principal. 

3. Unless with special permission, Male Students are not to 
be beyond College bounds on school days, except on afternoons 
between the hours of School Closing and the first Evening Bell. 
On holidays, Students who have permission to study in their 
rooms may leave bounds between Morning Worship and first 
Evening Bell. All others are expected to obtain permission 
before leaving bounds in the forenoon. In case of any misuse of 
these privileges, or of any misconduct on the part of the Students, 
these exceptions, or either one of them, may be withdrawn, either 
for one or more Students, or for the entire residence, and for 
such time as may seem best to the House-master or Principal. 

4. No Student is allowed out of College bounds from first 
Evening Bell to first Morning Bell without express permission 
from the Principal, or, in his absence, from the House-master. 

5. Male Students during recreation hours, must occupy their 
own side of the College grounds. 

6. All Male Students are expected to attend the Morning and 
Evening Study in the Main School-room, unless excused by the 
Principal. Steadiness of character, College standing and age, 
are chiefly considered in granting Students permission to study 
in their own rooms. Students taking full University or Third 



25 

Class work are allowed this privilege during good behavior. 
Such Students must remain in their own rooms during the regular 
study hours. 

7. Students are not allowed to carry firearms nor to keep them 
in their rooms. 

8. All detriments to the College building or furniture, whether 
by defacement, by breakage or otherwise, will be charged to the 
persons causing such detriment ; and " defacement " shall be 
considered to include carving or cutting with a knife, writing, 
scratching, scrawling or drawing, with a pen, pencil, chalk or 
otherwise. 

9. Drinking wine, beer, or spiritous liquors, the use of tobacco 
in any manner and in any place, profane swearing and card- 
playing, are strictly forbidden. A Student found guilty of 
any of these practices will for the first offence be admonished, 
for the second offence reprimanded, and for the third suspended, 
and, after investigation by the College Committee, expelled. 



EXTRACTS FROM GENERAL RULES OF CONDUCT FOR RESIDENT 
LADY STUDENTS. 

i. All Lady Students of the College are under the charge of 
the Governess, whose duty it is, with the aid of the Assistant 
Governess, to supervise their conduct and deportment, to correct 
for all ordinary delinquencies, and to report misconduct of a 
graver nature to the Principal. 

2. Lady Students are requested to refer all ordinary permis- 
sions to the Governess, or in her absence to the Assistant Gov- 
erness, who will as a rule decide them, but may, if she prefers, 
refer them to the Principal. 

3. Every afternoon, weather permitting, young ladies are ex- 
pected to walk out together for exercise. The Governess will 
arrange for the time and direction of these walks, and will either 
accompany the young ladies herself or provide a substitute. 

4. All Lady Students are expected to attend the Morning and 
Evening Study in the Main School-room, unless excused by the 
Principal. 



26 

5. Students are expected to remain in their own rooms after 
the Retiring Bell rings, and to retire at the time indicated by 
the Governess. No Student will be permitted to study later 
than ii p.m. 

6. No Student is allowed out of College bounds from first 
Evening Bell to first Morning Bell without express permission 
from the Principal, or, in his absence, from the Governess. 

7. Lady Students are expected at no time to go beyond College 
bounds unless they have obtained permission. 

8. All detriments to the College building or furniture, whether 
by defacement, by breakage or otherwise, will be charged to the 
persons causing such detriment. 

Note. — The above Rules and Regulations are not intended to be harsh or 
severe. They are made simply for the well-being of Students and the good 
government of the College. As the duties of the House-master and Gov- 
erness are in themselves sufficiently onerous, it is particularly requested that 
all Students under their care will, in a cheerful and courteous manner, con- 
form, as far as possible, to the Rules of the College, and thus render their 
duties much less irksome than they otherwise would be. 



HOUR TABLE. 

A.M. 

6.00 Morning Bell. 

6.25 Morning Study First Bell. 

6.30 " " Second Bell. 

7.25 Breakfast First Bell. 

7.35 " Second Bell. 

7.55 Morning Worship. 

8.55 School First Bell. 

9.00 " Second Bell. 

10.45 School recalled First Bell. 

10.50 " " Second Bell. 

12.00 School dismissed. 

P.M. 

12.15 Dinner One Bell. 

1.25 School First Bell. 

1.30 " Second Bell. 

4.00 School dismissed. 

5.45 Supper First Evening Bell. 

6.00 " Second Evening Bell. 

6.30 Evening Worship. 

6.55 Evening Study First Bell. 

7.00 " " Second Bell. 

9.00 Study dismissed. 

9.30 Retiring Bell. 



2 7 

Note, — When the season requires it, the bells preceding First School Bell 
will ring thirty minutes later, respectively. 

Parents, guardians, and students will please observe that a cheerful obedi- 
ence to the above General Rules and Regulations will be the conditions on 
which students remain in the College. Severe, or even frequent, punishment 
of any sort will not be resorted to. Gross misconduct or violation of rules 
will be met by instant suspension, and, after investigation by the College 
Committee, by dismissal. Persistent misconduct, even of a trifling nature, 
will be similarly dealt with. 



III. LITERARY SOCIETY. 

GENERAL COMMITTEE— SPRING TERM, 1884. 

President : 

W. H. Huston, M.A. 

Vice-Presidents : 
Fletcher Roach. Florence Margach. 

Sec-Treasurer : Sec. of General Committee : 

John D. Tripp. Augusta Schooley. 

Curator : Librarian : 

Aubrey Larke. Melissa Hunt. 

A ssistant- Curator. 
Ella Carlaw. 



PREVIOUS OFFICERS OF THE SOCIETY. 

Presidents : 

1879. — J. T. Richardson. G. W. Valentine. Lydia N, 
Bowerman. 
1880-81.— John E. Bryant, M.A. S. Percy Davis, M.A. 
1881-82.— S. Percy Davis, M.A. W. H. Huston, M.A. 

1883.— J. F. Barker. W. H. Huston, M.A. 

1884. — C. L. Crassweller, B.A. 

First Vice-Presidents : 

1879. — P. A. O. Malleson. Margaret Sing. Charlotte Richardson. 

1880.— W. V. Wright. E. S. Rowe. J. T. Dorland. 

1 881. — W. R. Noxon. Margaret E. Symington. 

1882.— G. A. McDiarmid. George R. Hyde. R. J. Broddy. 

1883. — Wm. Boyes. J. Mclndoo. Jesse Walton. 

1884. — A. Tupper. 



28 

Second Vice-Presidents : 

1879. — Lavina Hubbs. Caroline Rorke. R. D. Valentine. 
1880. — Lavina Hubbs. Geraldine Wright. Margaret E. Sym- 
ington. 
1 881. —Edith E. Lane. Edith M. Murray. Amy Vernon. 
1882. — Louisa Reazin. Daisy B. Carder. Janet Kennedy. 
1883. — L. N. Bowerman. Mary Eyres. J. B. Slater. 
1884.— Ada M. Brown. 

Secretaries : 

1878. — Samuel W. L'Amoreaux. Elizabeth B. Bowerman. 
James T. Richardson. George A. Jordan. J. P. 
Bowerman. 

Treasurers : 

1879. — T. D. McGaw. Gertrude Maclean. 

Secretary -Treasurers : 

1880.— J. W. Bunting. J. G. Morris. M. W. Brandon. Geo. 

Fleming. 
1881.— W. C. Noxon. H. F. Mounteer. G. A. MacDiarmid. 
1882. — M. Mclndoo. Charles Grogan. William Harris. 
1883.— Lewellys F. Barker. P. W. Blake. A. Webb. 
1884.— D. C. Baldwin. 

Secretaries of General Committees: 

1880. — Charlotte Richardson. Margaret Brown. Mary E. 

Clark. Louisa Reazin. 
1 881. —Fannie L. Rorke. Florence V. Mullett. Daisy B. 

Carder. 
1882. — Lottie G. Paxton. Charlotte Lochead. Mary Forsyth. 
1883. — Nettie Rogers. Lottie McKnight. Christina Anderson. 
1884.— Edith Walker. 

Librarians : 
1879. — Martha Rogers. 

1880. — Agnes Myers. Eliza Cody. Netta Jones. 
1881. — Winnie A. Hayward. Lila Paxton. Lottie G. Paxton. 
1882. — Libbie Barker. Esther Rogers. Edith Walker. 
!883. — Nellie Brown. M. J. Winnacott. Letitia Williams. 
1884. — Helen Freeman. 

Councillors : 

1879. — Mary J. Hubbs. C. R. Stovel. Margaret E. Symington. 

Curators : 

1880. — Charles Rogers. L. P. Pairo. 

1881.— T. H. Lumsden. G. Cormack. G. R. Hyde. 



2 9 

1 882.— E. C. Marter. W. G. Barnes. Hiram B. Thomson, 
1883.— Jas. K. Hessey. W. J. Proctor. W. G. Peckham. 
1884.— Walter Ashton. 

Assistant-Curators : 

1883. — Corinne Garrett. 
1884. — Nettie Rogers. 



IV. THE READING-ROOM. 

The Newspapers and other Periodicals supplied to the Read- 
ing-room are contributed partly by the Officers and Teachers of 
the College, partly by friends, and partly by the Students indi- 
vidually, but principally by the Literary Society of the Students, 
which during the past year assumed control of the Reading-room. 

The following is a list of the papers and magazines supplied 
during the past year: — 

Globe, Toronto Daily. 

Mail, Toronto " 

Christian Guardian, Toronto Weekly. 

Canadian Baptist " 

The Gazette, Montreal 

Huron Signal, Goderich " 

Times, Brooklin " 

News, Pickering " 

Gazette, Whitby 

Gazette, Barrie " 

The Week, Toronto " 

Mercury, Guelph " 

Muskoka Herald, Bracebridge " 

Chronicle, Whitby " 

News Record, Fergus " 

Musical Record, Boston " 

Sentinel Star, Cobourg " 

Publisher's Weekly, New York " 

Times, Peterborough " 

Harper's Weekly, New York " 

Standard, Port Perry " 

Grip, Toronto " 



3° 

Telegraph, Berlin Weekly. 

Canada Presbyterian, Toronto " 

Ontario Reformer " 

Canadian Farmer, Welland " 

Gazette, VioXon " 

Reporter, Gait 

Christian Worker, Chicago " 

Young Christian Soldier " 

Evangelical Chicrchman, Toronto " 

Weekly Ba?iner, Chatham " 

Canadian Illustrated News, Montreal Weekly. 

Planet, Chatham " 

Witness, Montreal " 

Herald, Guelph " 

U Aurore, Montreal " 

The Armory " 

The Christian " 

Canada Citizen, Toronto " 

Graphic, London " 

Canada Methodist Magazine, Toronto " 

Illustrated News, London " 

Haiper's Young People " 

Expositor of Holiness, Columbus , Ohio " 

Youth's Companion " 

' Varsity, Toronto " 

Purdys Fruit Recorder, Rochester " 

Gazette, Norwich " 

Atlantic Monthly Monthly. 

Ce?itury " 

Modern Stenographic Journal " 

Cosmopolitan Shorthander " 

Good Words 

American Bookseller " 

Bookseller " 

Canada School Journal " 

ladies' National Magazine " 

Student " 



3i 



Boy's Own Paper Monthly. 

Girts Ow?i Paper 

Harper's Monthly 

Leisure Hour 

Chambers 1 Journal 

St. Nicholas 

Simday at Home 

Home and Fireside Companion 

Routledge's Monthly 

Simday Magazine 

Canadian Educational Monthly 

The Earthamite 

Reporter's Magazi?ie 

Literary World Fortnightly. 



V. ATHLETIC CLUBS. 

Officers : 

(i) ARCHERY. 

1 884. President Miss Rogers. 

Vice-President Miss Slater. 

Secretary-Treasurer Melissa Hunt. 

Curator N ettie Rogers. 

Assistant Curator Augusta Schooley. 

(2) FOOT-BALL (ASSOCIATION RULES). 

1884. President E. J. Mclntyre, B.A. 

Vice-President Alfred Webb. 

Secretary- Treasurer N orman Reid . 

Captain Walter Ashton. 

Curator J. E. Ashton. 

(3) CRICKET. 

1884. President C. L. Crassweller, B.A. 

Vice-President T. Larkin. 

Secretary-Treasurer Geo. Mitchell. 

Captain W. H. Huston, M.A. 

Curator D. C. Baldwin.